SIMPLE ENGLISH GOTHIC STYLE


Dedicated to St. Paul

THE EARLIEST FOREIGN
CHURCH IN ATHENS
Philellinon facade and entrance

CONSECRATED ON
PALM SUNDAY IN 1843
St. Paul’s gate

BY THE RT REV,
GEORGE TOMLINSON
St. Paul’s seen
from Amalias Avenue

SIMPLE ENGLISH
GOTHIC STYLE

A PLACE OF WORSHIP,
PASTORAL CARE AND
SOCIAL ACTIVITIES

SUNG EUCHARIST
EVERY SUNDAY AT 10:15AM
St. Paul’s seen
from Amalias Avenue

OPEN SINCE PALM SUNDAY 1843

AN ANGLICAN presence has existed in Athens since early 1831, when Dr John Henry Hill, an American philanthropist and founder of a still-existing school, gathered Anglicans in his home for services. In 1836, the Rev. Henry Daniel Leeves (1789-1845) arrived in Athens as the representative of the British Foreign and Bible Society. Under their leadership, land was bought close to the Acropolis and some fifteen minutes’ walking distance from the Areopagus, the place where St. Paul spoke with the Athenians of his day (Acts 17.22). There, a church dedicated to St. Paul was erected.

Consecrated on Palm Sunday in 1843 by the Rt. Rev. George Tomlinson, Bishop of Gibraltar, St. Paul’s became the earliest foreign church in the city. Since then, it has been a focus of worship, pastoral care and cultural activities for the English-speaking residents of Athens, as well as for visitors travelling through Greece.

See Athens at the time of St. Paul’s consecration through the eyes of Edward Lear

Edward LEAR, Athens from Mount Lycabettus, 12 June 1848

Edward LEAR, Athens, 8 & 9 June 1848, Caption: The Temple of Jupiter, with St. Paul’s in the distance


At the time of its consecration, St. Paul’s was almost on the outskirts of the newly-established Greek capital, which numbered around ten thousand inhabitants. Today, St. Paul’s is in the very centre of the city, just four minutes’ walking distance from Syntagma (Constitution) Square and its metro station – and only a few minutes more from the Acropolis metro station.†